TEDxKyoto 2018 – BALANCE – Live BlogTEDxKyoto 2018 – BALANCE – Live Blog

TxK leaders

Sunday, November 4th, 2018:

*** Look for more information about the speakers and TEDxKyoto2018 event on this homepage, on our flickr photostream, and on other SNS outlets in the coming days. Stay tuned!

5:45 p.m. —

Elizaveta ends the day with quite a show – her hat, her voice, and her visuals are all designed to impress. Another mesmerizing performance that should really be viewed to fully experience.

5:21 p.m. —

Kenichi Wada has made his name in the world of lifesaving competitions and ‘beach flags’. With a fun and entertaining talk, he reminds us that we should all follow our childhood dreams and make a difference.

3 session kenichi

5:03 p.m. —

Gabriel Duque is an economist and diplomat. He explains how he believes that our strength as a species comes from our ability to build institutions — his concept of balance is in the systems that we build on a global scale. He asks a powerful and simple question: “How many of you think the world is getting worse?” → Then, he answers the question and explains that “progress is not perfection” – we are actually doing much better collectively than in the past. The Internet, while used by all, has to be governed in a borderless and open way. Gabriel gives us a new perspective, and opens our eyes, in yet another way. This is what TEDxKyoto is all about.

3 session gabriel

4:56 p.m. —

Priyanka Yoshikawa

Another speaker on our stage tells us about the balance between two cultural identities. As a model, she gained worldwide recognition. However, as a ‘ha-fu’ (half-Japanese) Priyanka experienced discrimination as a child, and we all felt her pain as she spoke about feeling different as a school kid, something many of us can relate to. She has used her high visibility position to promote more understanding – that it is the norm, rather than the exception, for people to be “balancing” between identities and cultures.

3 session priyanka

4:25 p.m. —

Takahiro Nakagome

Through the universal language of dance, Takahiro has made a difference in Africa. His video – and his happiness – are contagious. We’re all connected, and he showed us another way that we can balance interactions between the developed and the developing world. He won the “All Japan Teen Dance Championship” while studying at university. After his graduation, he left his job and pursued his dream of “”Traveling around the World and Teaching Dance to 10,000 Children!” Now he has fulfilled that dream and much more, bringing dance and peace to ovr 15,000 children, and establishing dance schools in Japan with the aim of bringing people from all walks of life together.

3 session takahiro

BREAK TIME 15 minutes

4:00 —

Toshiya Kakiuchi started with the powerful phrase “I want to walk.” He has spent most of his life since childhood in a wheelchair due to an incurable disease. His well-spoken and powerful message resonated with the hearts and minds of the entire venue. “Disability becomes a value if you change you viewpoint, barriers are substitutes for value by encouraging confrontation” which causes many people to take action. They are important opportunities to consider whether one can do something. Through his business and his life’s work, he is making a real difference.

2 session kakiuchi

3:34 p.m. —

Hiromi Yano is both a globalist and a localist. He has been to the middle east over a dozen times, and believes that people can create peace from a grassroots level. His personal stories about families and children give us the feeling that peace between Israel and Palestine is possible. His involvement using Japan and Japanese culture as a bridge has helped teach those that he has worked with that we are all people, and can identify on an individual basis. Intercultural understanding can start with simple friendship, one person to another.

2 session Hiromi Yano

3:23 p.m. —

Miki Ito is a space engineer. After completing Graduate School in Aerospace Engineering, she worked in research and development on the Yoyogi Small Satellite Project, and engaged in thermal structure design and testing work. After that, she joined Astro Schedule Japan R & D in April 2015 after taking over the guidance and development support work of foreign students for international students for about 1 year, and became President and Representative Director of the company. She is also engaged in engineering work, and now is working on the development of “ELSA-d (Elsa Dee)” debris removal satellite demonstration aircraft. In 2018, he was awarded the “Astro Woman Award” for “Forbes Emergent 25″ Nikkei WOMAN “Woman of the Year 2018″. Her talk really made the challenge of space junk sound interesting and exciting.

2 session Miki Ito

3:11 p.m. —

Usman Riaz has a powerful message with a simple theme: “Bloom where you are planted”. He has followed his dream to create an animation studio in Pakistan. He was inspired by Japanese hand drawn animation as a child, and now creates the same magical dreamy world using talent from his home country. He stresses that even though it is more difficult to start something from scratch in Pakistan, he considers it his responsibility to make his business in his homeland, rather than taking his talents elsewhere. It is an inspiring story, and the new animation that he debuted for everyone in attendance was well received, beautiful, and touching.

2 session Uzman
2:55 p.m.

After an introduction from TEDxKyoto founder and TEDx ambassador for Japan Jay Klaphake, Ayaka Tanimoto takes the stage. As he said, you rarely hear this phrase: “London based Opera singer whose hometown is Kyoto Japan”. The crowd is blown away by her outstanding vocal range and power. She mentions between songs that as a performer she is always seeking balance in her work and her music. Growing up in one culture, then living in another; starting her musical journey in one genre and finding her voice in another genre, her life is a story of balancing different facets of her identity.

2 session ayaka

BREAK TIME
All of the participants, and many of the volunteer staff, had an opportunity to meet and mix in the lobby, where they could have something to eat and drink. What an amazing group of peple are gathered here today. This is why we put so much time and effort into producing a world-class TEDx event in Kyoto.

1:49 —
Baye McNeil – after a minor technical difficulty with his microphone – touched on the delicate topic of balancing his personal identity as an American and more specifically as an African-American, with his life in Japan. He reminds us all to re-examine our “koto” – our internal baggage and the stereotypes that we carry around with us. With a casual easy in the way that he speaks, he was able to discuss a very serious topic, one which is close to many of us who have multiple identities and cultures in our lives.

Baye session one

1:40 p.m.

Yuko Shirakawa has worked all over the world in areas of conflict in order to help those in the world who are most at risk. Her work with Doctors without Borders is touching, and despite the difficulties and setbacks that she has experienced, she believes strongly in what she has done as a nurse in the most troubled areas in the world. As a result, her actions show us all that we can all do something to make the world a better place. We were moved and touched by what she had to say, and many in the audience gave her a standing ovation as she left the stage.

Yuko Shirakawa session one

1:14
Richard Milgrim has brought three of his very special pieces, ceremonial tea bowls from his kilns in both in Japan and in America. The description of the pieces and the stories that go with them both educate and enrich us on the topic of tea ceramics. Richard is both serious and philosophical, telling stories that have strong meanings and describe his personal journey through his life’s work on the path of “peace through a bowl of tea”. A true story of balance.

richard session one

1:02:
As Hiroko Morohashi says on the homepage of the United Sports Foundation, her personal goal is to help as many people as possible rediscover the ability sports have to give people courage and inspiration. Her aim is to contribute to the public’s mental and physical health by progressively creating opportunities to engage in sports. As a chairperson of the United Sports Foundation, she continues to make constructive efforts at a global level to further develop the world’s sports culture. Again, we hear the theme of balance as it can help the people of the world through teamwork.

Hiroko session one

12:39:
Ally Mobbs has the whole hall full of participants mesmerized with his amazing blend of samples, electronic music, and sounds both modern and traditional. Technology has taken his music and production in directions that wouldn’t have even been possible just a few years ago. If you have a chance, definitely look for more of his work online — it’s really one of a kind. The visuals, created especially for this venue, are also stunning and seasonal.

Ally session one

11:45 The Main Hall is filling up, and the participants are all trying to decide where to sit to experience the first speakers and performers. The beanbag gallery up in front looks very popular. Out in the lobby, everyone has been mixing and mingling, looking at the displays of all of the partners for our event. The coffee is flowing and the energy is high. We can’t wait for the opening of the event!

TxK team meeting

10:32 a.m.
Today is the big day, and after a busy rehearsal yesterday, virtually everything is in place. There is an air of excitement through the rooms, halls, and corridors of the Kyoto International Conference center. Final sound checks and displays. Our student volunteers have created an amazing arrangement of beanbag chairs down in front of the stage. The photography team is bustling around the hall, documenting all of the preparations. Communication team members are preparing posts on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and more, so that everyone around the world can see what TEDxKyoto is doing today. The cameras are ready to roll, and the livestream is ready to turn on when Session One starts promptly at 12:30. Speakers are a combination of relaxed, nervous, and excited. Everyone is doing their best to get ready, now we are waiting for the hall to fill up!

IMG_0234
TxK leaders

Sunday, November 4th, 2018:

3:11 p.m. —

Usman Riaz has a powerful message with a simple theme: “Bloom where you are planted”. He has followed his dream to create an animation studio in Pakistan. He was inspired by Japanese hand drawn animation as a child, and now creates the same magical dreamy world using talent from his home country. He stresses that even though it is more difficult to start something from scratch in Pakistan, he considers it his responsibility to make his business in his homeland, rather than taking his talents elsewhere. It is an inspiring story, and the new animation that he debuted for everyone in attendance was well received, beautiful, and touching.

2:55 p.m. —

After an introduction from TEDxKyoto founder and TEDx ambassador for Japan Jay Klaphake, Ayaka Tanimoto takes the stage. As he said, you rarely hear this phrase: “London based Opera singer whose hometown is Kyoto Japan”. The crowd is blown away by her outstanding vocal range and power. She mentions between songs that as a performer she is always seeking balance in her work and her music. Growing up in one culture, then living in another; starting her musical journey in one genre and finding her voice in another genre, her life is a story of balancing different facets of her identity.

BREAK TIME
All of the participants, and many of the volunteer staff, had an opportunity to meet and mix in the lobby, where they could have something to eat and drink. What an amazing group of peple are gathered here today. This is why we put so much time and effort into producing a world-class TEDx event in Kyoto.

1:49 p.m. —

Baye McNeil – after a minor technical difficulty with his microphone – touched on the delicate topic of balancing his personal identity as an American and more specifically as an African-American, with his life in Japan. He reminds us all to re-examine our “koto” – our internal baggage and the stereotypes that we carry around with us. With a casual easy in the way that he speaks, he was able to discuss a very serious topic, one which is close to many of us who have multiple identities and cultures in our lives.

Baye session one

1:40 p.m. —

Yuko Shirakawa has worked all over the world in areas of conflict in order to help those in the world who are most at risk. Her work with Doctors without Borders is touching, and despite the difficulties and setbacks that she has experienced, she believes strongly in what she has done as a nurse in the most troubled areas in the world. As a result, her actions show us all that we can all do something to make the world a better place. We were moved and touched by what she had to say, and many in the audience gave her a standing ovation as she left the stage.

Yuko Shirakawa session one

1:14 p.m. —
Richard Milgrim has brought three of his very special pieces, ceremonial tea bowls from his kilns in both in Japan and in America. The description of the pieces and the stories that go with them both educate and enrich us on the topic of tea ceramics. Richard is both serious and philosophical, telling stories that have strong meanings and describe his personal journey through his life’s work on the path of “peace through a bowl of tea”. A true story of balance.

richard session one

1:02 p.m. —
As Hiroko Morohashi says on the homepage of the United Sports Foundation, her personal goal is to help as many people as possible rediscover the ability sports have to give people courage and inspiration. Her aim is to contribute to the public’s mental and physical health by progressively creating opportunities to engage in sports. As a chairperson of the United Sports Foundation, she continues to make constructive efforts at a global level to further develop the world’s sports culture. Again, we hear the theme of balance as it can help the people of the world through teamwork.

Hiroko session one

12:39 p.m. —

Ally Mobbs has the whole hall full of participants mesmerized with his amazing blend of samples, electronic music, and sounds both modern and traditional. Technology has taken his music and production in directions that wouldn’t have even been possible just a few years ago. If you have a chance, definitely look for more of his work online — it’s really one of a kind. The visuals, created especially for this venue, are also stunning and seasonal.

Ally session one

11:45 a.m. —

The Main Hall is filling up, and the participants are all trying to decide where to sit to experience the first speakers and performers. The beanbag gallery up in front looks very popular. Out in the lobby, everyone has been mixing and mingling, looking at the displays of all of the partners for our event. The coffee is flowing and the energy is high. We can’t wait for the opening of the event!

TxK team meeting

10:32 a.m. —
Today is the big day, and after a busy rehearsal yesterday, virtually everything is in place. There is an air of excitement through the rooms, halls, and corridors of the Kyoto International Conference center. Final sound checks and displays. Our student volunteers have created an amazing arrangement of beanbag chairs down in front of the stage. The photography team is bustling around the hall, documenting all of the preparations. Communication team members are preparing posts on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and more, so that everyone around the world can see what TEDxKyoto is doing today. The cameras are ready to roll, and the livestream is ready to turn on when Session One starts promptly at 12:30. Speakers are a combination of relaxed, nervous, and excited. Everyone is doing their best to get ready, now we are waiting for the hall to fill up!

IMG_0234

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